35 words we don't have in the English language (but need)

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Do you ever find yourself fumbling through a thought, searching for the right word to express what you're trying to say? Sometimes, the word is on the tip of your tongue and eventually comes to you. But other times, there simply is no right word - not in English, at least.

Some foreign words just don't translate well into English, and vice versa. Which means that other languages open up whole new dictionaries of possibilities. Want to express the happiness you feel after reuniting with a friend after a long time apart? The French have a word for that: retrouvailles. Trying to describe that content, drowsy feeling that afflicts you after indulging in a large meal? The Italians have your back: abbiocco.

Other languages have so much to offer; and you don't always have to be left (ugh) explaining how you feel. Try throwing one or two of these words into your vocabulary. They work a whole lot better than stumbling through a: "You know that feeling when..."

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Age-otori

Bad haircut? You are age-otori. In Japanese, age-otori means looking worse after a haircut. You know, like Britney Spears did in 2007 or you did for all of seventh grade. You can try and eat these foods that are rumored to help your hair grow faster, but after you've gone age-otori, there's no going back.

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Aware

Aware is a word in English, as you're well aware. But in Japanese, the meaning is much different. Essentially, it refers to the bittersweet feeling you experience witnessing something beautiful that's about to disappear. For instance, watching the sunset may inspire some aware. It's gorgeous now, but in minutes, it will be gone.

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Backpfeifengesicht

Backpfeifengesicht is an elegant-sounding German word with an even more elegant definition: a face that looks like it needs a fist. Examples include the quarterback that wide receiver who just caught a football in your favorite NFL team's end zone and that guy who never tips his restaurant server.

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Epibreren

In Dutch, this word means do work on a task that looks important, but is actually just useless busywork. Some of your coworkers might be really good at practicing epibreren.

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Estrenar

This verb is a Spanish word meaning to use something for the first time. It can also refer to wearing something for the first time; if you're breaking in a new pair of boots, then tu estás estrenando las botas.

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Fisselig

You know how sometimes when someone's nagging you to do a million things, you just get all flustered and end up accomplishing nothing? That overwhelmed feeling of sudden incompetence is called fisselig in German.

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Fremdschämen

The opposite of another German word schadenfreude, fremdschämen refers to feeling heavily uncomfortable watching someone else screw up. It's kind of like sympathetic embarrassment, or that feeling of "ugh, I can't watch this anymore, it's too painful."

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Friolento

Do you love the summer and dread the fall, simply because the temperature drops? You might be a friolento - the Spanish word for someone who is extremely sensitive to the cold. Spaniards sometimes use this as an insult, kind of like calling someone a wimp because they can't stand a slight chill in the air. If this sounds like you, here are some warm destinations you should think about escaping to this winter.

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Gigil

You know when babies or animals are so freaking cute you can't help but have a sudden urge to squeeze them? That feeling is called gigil in the Phillipines. Here are some adorable animal photos that will probably make you feel that way. (You're welcome.)

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Greng-jai

So you really need help moving, but don't want to ask your friends because you know it's a huge task. You don't want to be a burden! That reluctant feeling before asking for help is called greng-jai in Thai. But don't let greng-jai get to you - so long as you ask politely, your friends probably won't mind!

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Iktsuarpok

Every good host has experience with iktsuarpok. In Inuit, this word refers to the feeling of eager anticipation while waiting for someone to arrive at your house.

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Jayus

When you hear a joke that's so terrible you can't help but laugh, that joke is a jayus. In Indonesian, a jayus is a joke that totally bombs.

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Jelak

Jelak is an expression you use when you feel like eating one more bite of a particularly rich food could make you throw up. You might wish you had this Malaysian word on Thanksgiving. Jelak, he said while putting his pie fork down in defeat.

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Kummerspeck

This word directly means "grief bacon." But what it actually refers to is weight that you gained from emotionally eating. The word also refers to a popular German restaurant in Massachusetts where you could, if need be, drown your grief in bacon.

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Kvell

"Daniel learned how to make matzo ball soup all on his own and I'm just kvelling!" Every proud Jewish grandmother loves this word. To kvell over someone or something is to gush with pride over it.

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Litost

This Czech word refers to the crushing human experience of feeling sorrow while observing one's own misery. Milan Kundera, author of the novel "The Unbearable Lightness of Being," famously said of the word litost, "I have looked in vain in other languages for an equivalent, though I find it difficult to imagine how anyone can understand the human soul without it."

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Mamihlapinatapei

There's one breadstick left on a restaurant table, where two people are sitting who both want it. The two people look at one another, both wanting to grab it but hesitant to reach for it first. The look they exchange is called mamihlapinatapei in Yagan, the indigenous language of the Tierra del Fuego region of South America. The word more generally refers to a look between two people who both want to initiate something, but are, for some reason or another, reluctant to start.

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Manja

In Malaysian, manja means coquettish, childlike behavior performed by a woman in the attempt to be pampered or gain sympathy from a man. And ladies, it might not come across as cute as you think.

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Mokita

In New Guinea, mokita refers to a true fact that everybody knows, but no one says out loud. It's not unlike "the elephant in the room," but it's less about the shame aspect of a hidden truth and more about keeping it unspoken.

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Nunchi

Nunchi, a word in Japanese, is a subtle art that's hard to describe - it's basically the ability to listen well and correctly interpret another person's mood. It's sort of like having emotional intelligence, only more conversational. Someone with nunchi probably avoids most of these common ways people are unintentionally rude.

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Olfrygt

Translated literally, this Danish word means "ale fright." That's fitting, because when the Vikings devised this word, they meant it in reference to the fear that you might run out of beer. It also refers to the disappointment of traveling somewhere that doesn't have a bar or other place to acquire booze. You'd be hard-pressed to find a town without a bar in America; here are 150 of the best bars!

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Razbliuto

In Russian, razbliuto is a somber saying that refers to the feeling you have towards a person you once loved. It can also apply to objects you once loved; it's how we feel about Starbucks now that we realize how much money we're spending there. Razbliuto, Starbucks. Razbliuto.

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Schadenfreude

This German word has nothing to do with Sigmund Freud, though he likely experienced a great deal of it judging by his profession. Schadenfreude is the feeling of enjoyment that comes from hearing about others' misery.

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Schlimazl

Don't be flattered if your bubbe calls you a schlimazl. This Yiddish word means a person who is chronically unlucky and always screwing up. Broken glass again? You're such a schlimazl!

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Sobremesa

The Spanish don't rush through their meals like many Americans do - it's customary to sit and talk for hours over multiple courses of home-cooked food and multiple glasses of wine. After they've eaten, they often just sit and chat, enjoying that full, wine-drunk feeling after consuming a delicious meal. The cozy custom has a name: sobremesa. Americans need a nice-sounding equivalent - and to indulge in sobremesa more often.

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Tartle

Going through a tartle might give you a startle. This Scottish word refers to a brief moment of fear experienced before introducing someone whose name you don't remember. Forgetting someone's name? Still not one of the rudest things you can do as a host.

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Tingo

To successfully pull off tingo, you have to be super sneaky. In the Pascuense language of Easter Island, tingo refers to the act of slowly stealing everything from a person's home by "borrowing" items one by one. Unlike these other unintentional slip-ups, you know this is rude.

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Torschlusspanik

This German word refers to the crippling fear that time is running out. More specifically, it applies to the worry that you will not be able to accomplish a certain goal before it's too late. Whether it's fear of death or a deadline, it's no fun to feel torschlusspanik.

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Treppenwitz

In German, this word refers to the moment when you think of the perfect comeback - only it's too late to use it. Oh, treppenwitz, not again!

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Uitwaaien

Most of us could use more uitwaaiens in our lives. This Dutch word refers to an excursion to the countryside, taken with the purpose of clearing your head. These peaceful, relaxing destinations are good places to go if you're looking to indulge in an uitwaaien.

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Verschlimmbesserung

Verschlimmbesserung is German for an "improvement" that actually just made things worse. For example: When Trix tried to take artificial coloring out of its cereal, that was a major verschlimmbesserung

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Waldeinsamkeit

Waldeinsamkeit is the feeling of being alone in the woods. The German word's definition does not specify whether the emotion is positive or negative - only that it exists. Guess it depends on the view!

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Weltschmerz

Weltscherz is a German word for a gloomy, romanticized aura of sadness afflicting someone who's really quite privileged. Your psych major friend in college who spent a lot of time writing sad poetry probably experienced a lot of it.

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Ya'arburnee

In Arabic, this word literally translates to "May you bury me." Declaring ya'arburnee to someone means that you wish you would die before they do, because living without them sounds unbearable. It's definitely not something to throw around lightly, but it's quite the heavy sentiment.

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Yuputka

In Ulwa, a language spoken in Papua New Guinea, yuputka refers to the sense of something crawling across your skin. You might compare the sensation to the feeling after you walk through a spider web or hear someone talking about lice. The closest thing we have to this phrase in English is "the heebie-jeebies." You might have felt yuputka while wandering through the woods at night, or while walking inside of a haunted house. These famous houses are legitimately haunted - and sure to give you yuputka.

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